Agile and (Offshore) Outsourcing: Aspect #2 – Distributed Agile

This is Part #3 of the series of posts devoted to combining agile methodologies with software development outsourcing. You can find Parts #1 and #2 here and here.

One of the main challenges in agile outsourcing is organizing the agile process (e.g., Scrum) in a distributed team. Typically, the Product Owner is on the client side, while the development team is on the provider side, often several time zones away from the client. The Scrum Master is normally residing with the development team, though some clients insist on using their Scrum Master. But let’s leave the remote Scrum Master situation for somebody else to dissect and concentrate on the ever-present issue: the remote Product Owner (PO). Continue reading

Agile and (Offshore) Outsourcing: Aspect #1 – Business Model

This is Part #2 of the series of posts devoted to combining agile methodologies with software development outsourcing. You can find Part #1 here.

Why is the question of the business model that important? It becomes clear when you look at the seemingly weak controls that the client organization has over the work of the agile team provided by the outsourcing provider.

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IAOP Recognizes Auriga as One of the Best Leaders in Research & Development Services

Auriga has made the International Association of Outsourcing Professionals® (IAOP®) Global Outsourcing 100® list for the sixth consecutive year.

Auriga, an expert software R&D and IT outsourcing services provider, is pleased to announce that it has been named to the International Association of Outsourcing Professionals® (IAOP®) 2013 Global Outsourcing 100® list for the sixth consecutive year. The 2013 Global Outsourcing 100 and The World’s Best Outsourcing Advisors lists with sub-lists were published in a special outsourcing advertising section in the May 20 Fortune 500 issue of FORTUNE® magazine. Continue reading

Agile and (Offshore) Outsourcing in Software Development: The Eternal Love/Hate Story

Agile is far from being a purely hype-driven software development phenomenon. In fact, if you think about it, it’s a very natural methodology to embrace for technology vendors.

First, a company that develops its own high-tech product—hardware and software—has to deal with constantly changing requirements. You get new clients (especially new key clients at the dawn of the new product development), and they bring new requirements. You hit the market with a new version, and you get feedback that affects your roadmap. You start developing something only to be met with unforeseen technical obstacles or come up with a new inventive approach that simplifies everything but affects the way your project looks and feels. In short, you never know how your requirements will change in three months from any point in its lifecycle. Continue reading

Don’t Over-Optimize Your Candidates

This post is inspired by the recent article in the Harvard Business Review blog called “Job’s Titles Aren’t That Important” . I absolutely agree with Matt Ferguson that, rather than looking for perfect matches, the hiring managers shouldn’t be afraid to hire the candidates who have experience in adjacent areas. In fact, the statistics provided by the author show that successful hiring managers do that more often (by 10+ percent) than those who struggle to close the positions (though no surprise here). Continue reading